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Detroit e-Bulletin

August 24–October 6
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"When you ain't got nothin', you got nothin' to lose." –Bob Dylan, "Like a Rolling Stone"

There are many possible points of entry into Lisa D'Amour's dazzlingDetroit. It's such an ambitious, multi-layered play, a play I am convinced should be on college syllabi a hundred years from now, assuming colleges still exist. In talking about the play to a group of supporters the other night, I found myself saying, "It's kind of Richard II meets Awake and Sing meets True West meets The Bacchae, with a little Robocop and "The Honeymooners" thrown in for zest." I don't mean to imply it's some kind of post-modern mishmash. It's actually my flip attempt to identify the play's originality and its depth. ...

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My brother Chris, the quintessential charming New Orleans host, has a game he often starts at parties after downing an Old-Fashioned or two. He especially loves to play it when his guests include people from different facets of his life—relative strangers to each other who might need an icebreaker in order to really relax. He'll smile, lean back in his chair, take a sip of his cocktail and begin: "Alright everybody, one question: If you could have any other job than the job you have now, what would it be?" ...

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ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT, CAST, & DIRECTOR

Visit our show page to read more about Detroit, including bios for Amy Herzog, Carolyn Cantor and the cast!

Detroit 


"I think I am feeling another skin just below my real skin. It's been there the whole time." –Mary, in Detroit

Christine and Léa Papin, sisters born six years apart, were described by the few who knew them as extremely quiet and retiring young women; but on the evening of February 2, 1933, they did something unexpected. For seven years, they had worked as live-in maids to the family of Monsieur René Lancelin, who came home that evening to discover his wife and daughter dead, beaten beyond recognition, their eyes gouged out. ...

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BACKSTORY: FIRST RING

"Plywood has a lifespan of 40 years. Over time, the glue that holds plywood together dries up. Then, walls buckle, split and peel. Panels pop loose. Rooms, doors and windows morph into trick-or-treat versions of themselves." –Herbert Muschamp, The New York Times, October 19, 1997

Famed architecture critic Herbert Muschamp declared a state of emergency in the "first-ring" suburbs of the US, the subdivisions of single-family homes built around metropolitan cores in the period between the end of WWII and the mid-1970s. Lisa D'Amour sets her play Detroit in one of these suburbs, and the above quote serves as an epigraph on the play's first page. ...

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MEET THE TEAM

During the run of The Great God Pan, post-performance discussions with Lisa D'Amour and Anne Kauffman have been scheduled for the following dates:

– Wednesday, August 29
– Tuesday, September 4
– Sunday, September 9 (following the matinee)

These discussions are an important aspect of our play development process. We hope you can take part! 


helpful information

LOG IN & BOOK YOUR SEATS BOOKING INFO CALENDAR & INFO

MEMBER PRICES

Member tickets to Detroit are $35 each (reg. $70) for perforamnces August 24–September 2 and $40 each through October 7. YOUNG MEMBERS: 30&Under Member tickets are $20; Student Member tickets are $10.

Age appropriate?

We recommend Detroit for those aged 14+. 

DIRECTIONS/PARKING/NEIGHBORHOOD DISCOUNTS

Go to Plan Your Visit to find out more about directions, parking, and neighborhood discounts!