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Your Mother's Copy of the Kama Sutra e-Bulletin

MARCH 28–MAY 11
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How honest are we about sex? The Kama Sutra of Vātsyāyana is a sacred Hindu text composed about eighteen hundred years ago. It was first published privately in English by an erotophile named Sir Richard Burton in 1883 and began to appear in pirated publications around the same time that Freud published The Interpretation of Dreams. When Burton died, his wife reportedly burned most of his private erotic literature collection. As the most recent translator of The Kama Sutra, Aditya N. D. Haksarhas, points out, most English-speakers only know this ancient text via marketed “Illustrated” publications that highlight the notorious descriptions of copulatory positions that actually comprise only about one twentieth of the original work. A fairer summary would characterize it as a broad survey of sexual and social relationships between men and women. I lay out this bit of world literary history for you to come clean about my own way into Kirk Lynn’s fascinating, insightful, and moving story of a man’s messy journey from marriage to fatherhood.  

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I’m a member of the writer’s cult that craves early mornings. 5:00 AM, 4:30 in my most maniacal phases. 4:00 is too early for me, but I only know because I tried. 

Quiet. Solitude. Discipline. Darkness. Stubbornness. Stillness.

There are lots of ways to wake up. I love strong, French-press coffee, an ice cube in it so I don’t have to wait for it to cool. And I usually wake up my writing with some small project or exercise I can noodle around with in the first 5, 10, 15 minutes it takes to get my brain cooking. The Austrian writer Thomas Bernhard, who trained as a pianist, called these small projects ‘finger exercises.’ 

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ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT, CAST, & DIRECTOR

Visit our show page to read more about Your Mother's Copy of the Kama Sutra including bios of Kirk Lynn, Anne Kauffman, and the cast!

Your Mother's Copy of the Kama Sutra


Perhaps the world’s most obscure guru of actor training, Stella Burden is among some circles the most legendary. The details of her biography are hazy and too weird to be true, but we do know that after decades of teaching in the States she expatriated to South America to found an academy in the jungle. Save for an enigmatic manual for acting students and a catalog of physically hazardous exercises, we’re left with mere fragments of “the other Stella” (as she was known) and her version of “The Method,” which she called “The Approach.”

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BACKSTORY: the x-factor

When asked why it is so interesting to write about sex, playwright Wallace Shawn observed, “Sex is still shocking. Conflict is built into the theme of sex because people’s desires are often at cross-purposes.” Conflict, the very essence of drama, makes the stage an ideal space to explore and perform the myriad faces of human sexuality. By tracing the ways in which theater has treated sex, we can track some changing cultural views of sex through history. 

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SAVE tHE DATE: GALA 2014

IN THE BEGINNING: 
HONORING FOUNDING ARTISTIC DIRECTOR BOB MOSS
WITH HOSTS DAVID HYDE PIERCE AND MARY TESTA
MONDAY, MAY 5TH

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Farewellcome

The gang at Playwrights Horizons bids a fond, tearful farewell to Associate Literary Manager Alec Strum who, for love, moved to sunnier and more western skies in January. From 2008-2013, Alec was an invaluable member of our literary department. A cohort, a co-conspirer, a prince and a pal, Alec brought a powerful generosity, imagination and insight to every page of every script he encountered during his time here. He’s sipping mojitos at some beach café in San Diego now, approximately 2,851 miles away, but he will always be a part of the family.





But the hanky we waved at the back of Alec’s U-Haul we used to dust off his chair, excitedly welcoming Sarah Lunnie to the fold. While Alec was packing up boxes in Brooklyn, Sarah Lunnie was loading a van in Kentucky. Having spent 2008-2013 in the Literary Department at Actors Theatre of Louisville, ascending the ranks from Literary Fellow to Literary Manager, Sarah contributed to six seasons of the celebrated Humana Festival. Sarah, though you may find that a walk down 42nd is less palliative than the banks of the Ohio, and though we may have a smaller selection of bourbon, you’ll find the pizza’s better and we’re happy as clams that you’re here.

 


post-performance discussions

During the run of Your Mother's Copy of the Kama Sutra, post-performance discussions with Kirk Lynn and Anne Kauffman have been scheduled for the following dates:

– Tuesday April 1
– Wednesday, April 9
– Sunday, April 13 (following the matinee)

These discussions are an important aspect of our play development process. We hope you can take part!


helpful information

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MEMBER PRICES

MEMBERS: tickets to Kama Sutra are $30 for all performances. YOUNG MEMBERS: 30&Under Member tickets are $20; Student Member tickets are $10.

GUEST TICKETS

SUBSCRIBERS: Order guest tickets for $45 each when you reserve your own.

FLEXPASS HOLDERS:  FlexPass holders may use tickets in your account to bring guests.  Add tickets to your account by calling Ticket Central (Noon-8pm daily) at (212) 279-4200.  Restrictions apply.

MEMBERS: Order one guest ticket per package per production for $50 when you reserve your own.

YOUNG MEMBERS:  You can buy one guest ticket per production. If your guest is 30 or under, the ticket is $30. If your guest is a full-time Student, the ticket is $20.  Proof of age and/or student ID will be required for each ticket picked up.

Age appropriate?

We recommend Kama Sutra for those aged 16+. 

DIRECTIONS/PARKING/NEIGHBORHOOD DISCOUNTS

Go to Plan Your Visit to find out more about directions, parking, and neighborhood discounts!