Menu

Mr. Burns e-Bulletin

AUGUST 23–OCTOBER 20
LOG IN & BOOK YOUR SEATS BOOKING INFO CALENDAR & INFO  PDF VERSION  

Culture mongers relentlessly peddle dystopic futurist scenarios in TV and movies.  Despite all evidence we might be sated with zombie/vampire/invading alien/oncoming asteroid/catastrophic climate change/magnetic pole inversion/nuclear meltdown disaster epics, the shows keep coming.  Most of these would fall decidedly into the bottom left “Lowbrow/Despicable” quadrant of New York Magazine’s Approval Matrix (except maybe The Walking Dead, which nudges just slightly into the Lowbrow/Brilliant quadrant).  Anne Washburn’s ridiculously inspired Mr. Burns shoots straight into my personal “Highbrow/Brilliant” by riffing on one entirely plausible disaster scenario, the disintegration of our electric grid, and turning it inside out.  It reminds me of how I felt when I first read Christopher Durang’s seminal Betty’s Summer Vacation, which took the ’90s obsession with trash culture (remember Lorena Bobbitt and the Menendez brothers?) and exploded it to smithereens by inhabiting it so blithely.  I had no idea how much I needed Durang's play until I read it.  I felt the same way about Anne’s play. 

READ MORE


This play comes from an idea which had been knocking around in my head for years:  I wanted to take a pop culture narrative and see what it meant, and how it changed, after the fall of Civilization.  Really just because I was curious; I write plays because that part of my brain is more entertaining to me than this part of my brain.  

I knew I wanted to start with an act of recollection, with a group of survivors trying to piece together a TV episode.  And to do that, I wanted to work with a group of actors; remembering is complicated; I could make remembering up, but it would never be as rich and complex as the real thing. 

READ MORE


ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT, CAST, & DIRECTOR

Visit our show page to read more about Mr. Burns including bios for Anne Washburn, Michael Friedman, Steve Cosson, and the cast!

MR. BURNS, A POST-ELECTRIC PLAY


Q:  Tell me a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer.
A:  I have a lot of vivid earthquake memories...

– from an interview with Anne Washburn 

In the classic parlor game Balderdash, players compose fake definitions for a real word – the more obscure, the better – and then mix these imagined definitions with the actual definition.  “The Dasher” reads them all aloud, and everyone casts votes on what they think is the truth.   If you guess correctly, you score.  But you also score when another player votes for the lie you invented.

READ MORE


BACKSTORY: THE END OF THE WORLD AS WE D'OH IT

The end times have been with us for a long time.  Nearly every human culture has postulated some epic finale for the universe.  But as our power to shape the world (for better or worse) has grown, so has the genre of doom.  The Industrial Revolution brought a spike in apocalyptic fiction (Mary Shelley’s The Last Man, 1826; H.G. Wells’s The Time Machine, 1895; and War of the Worlds, 1898), but the atom bomb kicked things into high gear, exponentially multiplying the ways we’ve been able to conceive of our end.  In the last seventy years, our stories have wiped civilization from the planet’s surface by way of nuclear war, pandemic, extraterrestrial attack, impact event, cybernetic revolt, technological singularity, dysgenics, runaway climate change, resource depletion, ecological collapse, assorted geological and astronomical catastrophes, and that old standby: divine judgment.  But what of after?

READ MORE


post-performance discussions

During the run of Mr. Burns, post-performance discussions with Anne Washburn, Michael Friedman, and Steve Cosson have been scheduled for the following dates:

Wednesday, August 28
Sunday, September 1 (following the matinee)
Friday, September 6

These discussions are an important aspect of our play development process. We hope you can take part!

BOOK YOUR SEATS 


WELCOME, NEW PATRONS!

The Playwrights Horizons Development Department would like to welcome the following donors* who joined the Patron Program this past season, and thank them for their generous support of our mission to develop and produce new plays and musicals by American writers, composers and lyricists. 

The majority of funds raised are seen on our stages, with approximately 83% of contributions directly underwriting production and program expenses.   Patrons can feel secure that their gifts are well spent when only approximately 17% of the organization’s annual expenses support administrative and development costs.

Patrons receive two full subscriptions plus invitations to exclusive special events throughout the season.

If you would like more information, or to join the Playwrights Horizons Patron Program, please contact our Manager of Individual Giving, Adam Turner at (212) 564–1235 x3145 or  aturner@phnyc.org.  See benefits list.

Anonymous
Ruth & Randy Abend
Jen Ablon
Diane Archer & Stephen Presser
Beverly Baker
Sharon E. & Stephen Baum
Jill & John Bishop
Jean G. Bortner
Prudence Brown
Rip Brown
Marc Castle
Leslie & Sylvia Cline
Jill & Irwin Cohen
Nancy & Larry Cole
Cass Conrad
Douglas S. Cramer & Hugh Bush
Carol & Tom Creel
Thea Duell & Peter Cook
Scott Emery
Carla Emil & Rich Silverstein
Anna May & Tim Feige
Renee Flug
Virginia Gilbert
Deborah Goldfrank & Justin Wender
Lesley Goldwasser & Jonathan Plutzik
Terina Golfinos & Robert Lisi
Judy Goodman
Judith A. Guido
Jill & Martin Handelsman
Robert & Mary Higgins
Rory Jones
Bruce Kaplan & Janet Yaseen
Susan B. Kaplan
Liz & George Krupp
Emily & Daniel Kuriloff
Robb Lady
Thomas Langston
Sandi & Thomas Lawless
Kathleen Lingo
Chien Cho Liu
Jody Locker Berger
Nina Matis
Julia McGee & Martin Maleska
Barbara Medlin
Rosemary Newman
William Packard
Susan Paine
Frank H. & Patti S. Penski
Perakis Family
Barbara Raho
Ricki Roer
Dawn & Mark Rosso
David Rothman
Valerie Rubsamen
Carolyn L. Ruby
Dean Rudoy
Irving & Amy Scher
Anthony Sneed
Patricia Brown Specter
Kathy Speer & Terry Grossman
Eric Starkman
David & Ann Swope
Bonnie Ward Simon
Jay M. Weiss
Handira Yaramani
Gloria Zeche

*As of June 5, 2013.


helpful information

LOG IN & BOOK YOUR SEATS BOOKING INFO CALENDAR & INFO

MEMBER PRICES

Member tickets to Mr. Burns are $30 each (reg. $70) for performances 8/23–9/8 and $35 for performances 9/10–10/6. YOUNG MEMBERS: 30&Under Member tickets are $20; Student Member tickets are $10.

GUEST TICKETS

SUBSCRIBERS: Order guest tickets for $50 each (reg. $70) when you reserve your own.

FLEXPASS HOLDERS:  FlexPass holders may use tickets in your account to bring guests.  Add tickets to your account by calling Ticket Central (Noon-8pm daily) at (212) 279-4200.  Restrictions apply.

MEMBERS: Order one guest ticket per package per production for $50 when you reserve your own.

YOUNG MEMBERS:  You can buy one guest ticket per production. If your guest is 30 or under, the ticket is $30. If your guest is a full-time Student, the ticket is $20.  Proof of age and/or student ID will be required for each ticket picked up.

Age appropriate?

We recommend Mr. Burns for those aged 10+. 

DIRECTIONS/PARKING/NEIGHBORHOOD DISCOUNTS

Go to Plan Your Visit to find out more about directions, parking, and neighborhood discounts!