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Bella: An American Tall Tale image 1

Photo by Karen Almond

Bella: An American Tall Tale image 2
Bella: An American Tall Tale image 3

Kirsten Childs photo by Zack DeZon

Bella: An American Tall Tale


Mainstage Theater

SUN
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
     MAY 19
8:00 PM
MAY 20
8:00 PM
MAY 21
2:30 PM
7:30 PM
MAY 22MAY 23
7:00 PM
MAY 24
7:00 PM
MAY 25
8:00 PM
MAY 26
8:00 PM
MAY 27
2:30 PM
8:00 PM
MAY 28
2:30 PM
7:30 PM
MAY 29MAY 30
7:00 PM
MAY 31
7:00 PM
JUN 1
8:00 PM
JUN 2
7:00 PM
JUN 3
2:30 PM
8:00 PM
JUN 4
2:30 PM •
7:30 PM
JUN 5JUN 6
7:00 PM •
JUN 7
7:00 PM
JUN 8
8:00 PM
JUN 9
8:00 PM
JUN 10
2:30 PM
8:00 PM
JUN 11
2:30 PM
7:30 PM
JUN 12JUN 13
JUN 14
7:00 PM
JUN 15
8:00 PM
JUN 16
8:00 PM
JUN 17
2:30 PM
8:00 PM
JUN 18
2:30 PM
7:30 PM
JUN 19JUN 20
7:00 PM
JUN 21
7:00 PM
JUN 22
8:00 PM
JUN 23
8:00 PM
JUN 24
2:30 PM
8:00 PM
JUN 25
2:30 PM
7:30 PM
JUN 26JUN 27
7:00 PM
JUN 28
7:00 PM
JUN 29
8:00 PM
JUN 30
8:00 PM
JUL 1
2:30 PM
8:00 PM
JUL 2
2:30 PM
7:30 PM
      
Post-Performance Discussion •
Open Caption Performance •

 

SubPlus and Artistic Director's Circle/Patrons/Gen PH may book beginning Mar 20.
Subscribers and Friends may book beginning Mar 27.
FlexPass holders/Members/Young Members may book beginning Apr 10.
Tickets go on sale to the public Apr 18.

We recommend Bella for ages 10 and up (mild swearing).

The show runs 2 hours and 30 minutes including intermission.

Reviews

Playwrights' Perspectives

Playwright's Perspective: Bella

This musical is the result of something I experienced while coming home to my apartment one bright, sunny day. A young African American couple was ahead of me, walking in the same direction. The woman was short and voluptuous, her most outstanding feature her gloriously shaped Venus Hottentot behind (Google it on your iPhone). As I walked behind the couple, the most amazing thing happened.

Essay

From the Artistic Director: Bella

Not everyone loves musicals. Tell some theater-goers you are doing a musical, and they’ll reply automatically, “I don’t like musicals,” kind of like in La La Land when Emma Stone’s character shrugs, “I don’t like jazz.” I get it.

Essay

The American Voice: Reclaiming the Myth

A very personal search for identity wrapped in traditional musical comedy structure, the piece plays fast and funny, drawing on musical idioms that span the American canon, including musical theater, jazz, and ’60s-infused R&B. Bubbly Black Girl takes to heart the old adage “write what you know.” Kirsten explores just what it means to be a musical theater writer, as well as how her own search for identity might have larger meaning.