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Lucas Hnath

Lucas Hnath’s plays include The Christians (2014 Humana Festival), Red Speedo (Studio Theatre, DC), A Public Reading of an Unproduced Screenplay About the Death of Walt Disney (Soho Rep), nightnight (2013 Humana Festival), Isaac's Eye (Ensemble Studio Theatre), Death Tax (2012 Humana Festival, Royal Court Theatre), and The Courtship of Anna Nicole Smith (Actors Theatre of Louisville).

Lucas has been a resident playwright at New Dramatists since 2011 and is a proud member of Ensemble Studio Theatre.

Lucas is a winner of the 2012 Whitfield Cook Award for Isaac’s Eye and a 2013 Steinberg/ATCA New Play Award Citation for Death Tax. He is also a recipient of commissions from the EST/Sloan Project, Actors Theatre of Louisville, South Coast Repertory, Playwrights Horizons, New York University’s Graduate Acting Program, and the Royal Court Theatre. (As of 2/2/15)

Reviews

More Reviews

Interview

Lucas Hnath Artist Interview

Tim Sanford: What were your early influences that pushed you into becoming an artist and a playwright? Lucas Hnath: I think it came in part from growing up in Orlando so close to Disney World, which is an incredibly theatrical place. In a lot of ways my interest in theater and in art started there. I really wanted to make Disney rides when I was a kid.

Interview

The Christians Symposium

The Christians Symposium — where the playwright asks the questions. Moderated by Lucas Hnath, featuring a panel with Lesley Hazleton, Mark Schultz, and Reverend Ann Kansfield. To avoid skipping errors in the beginning of the video, skip ahead to 2:12.
Watch live streaming video from howlround at livestream.com

Playwrights' Perspectives

Playwright's Perspective: The Christians

When I was younger, I was supposed to be a preacher, but I decided it would be too much responsibility. I didn't want to worry about other peoples’ souls. I switched to pre-med. I didn't want to worry about other peoples’ bodies. And so, I switched to playwriting.

Essay

Tim Sanford on The Christians

Lucas Hnath has described ‘The Christians’ as his “big little play about faith in America.” When I first encountered it in its premiere production at the Humana Festival in Louisville, it seemed unequivocally big to me. I saw mainly the broad, timely thematic conflict that ensues when the pastor of an evangelical, Bible-literalist church preaches a game-changing sermon.

Essay

The American Voice: The Known World

Three summers ago, Lucas Hnath sent me an email at Actors Theatre of Louisville, where I used to be the literary manager, with a Word document attached. “Well gosh,” his message began, “this was kind of fun. I went through my list of notes and organized it and turned my shorthand into complete sentences. So here are 17 ideas for plays.” (“There were even more that I didn’t include,” he added.)

Essay

Backstory: Notes on Tragedy

Over time, words change meaning, and language evolves just like everything else. Back in the day, for instance, if your son was a “determined bachelor,” you’d be proud of his knighthood, and if he brought home his broke, underage girlfriend to meet you, you could call her a “naughty wench” without ruining Christmas. “Sick” was ill, and so was “ill”; “thongs” were flip-flops, “bad” was bad, and a “gay marriage” wasn’t anything to argue about. And whether you consider the evolution of language a science, a history lesson, or a damn shame, it's an insight to the evolution of how we think.