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Itamar Moses

ITAMAR MOSES is the author of the full-length plays Outrage, Bach at Leipzig, Celebrity Row, The Four of Us, Yellowjackets, Back Back Back and Completeness; the musicals Nobody Loves You (with Gaby Alter) and Fortress of Solitude (with Michael Friedman and Daniel Aukin); and an evening of short plays called Love/Stories (Or But YouWill Get Used to It). His work has appeared Off-Broadway and elsewhere in New York, at regional theatres across the country and in Canada, and is published by Faber & Faber and Samuel French. He has received new play commissions from the McCarter Theatre, Playwrights Horizons, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, The Wilma Theater, South Coast Rep, Manhattan Theatre Club, Lincoln Center and Goodman Theatre. On television, Itamar has written for both TNT’s “Men of a Certain Age” and HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire.” Itamar holds an M.F.A. in Dramatic Writing from NYU and has taught playwriting at Yale and NYU. He is a member of the Dramatists Guild and MCC Playwrights Coalition, and is a New York Theatre Workshop Usual Suspect. He was born in Berkeley, CA and now lives in Brooklyn, NY.  (As of September 2011)

Playwrights' Perspectives

Itamar Moses on "Completeness"

A few years ago, while cleaning out some boxes or desk drawers in my childhood home, my mom came across something she thought I might like to have: a booklet in which my pediatrician, Dr. Grossman, had recorded his observations about me over the course of the first six years of my life. In this booklet, between directives about diet and the dates of various milestones ("Sat without support: six months." "First step: age one."), are peppered some frank assessments of my personality and temperament: At one year, six and a half months: "Expect his tantrums to recur."

Interview

Tim Sanford and Itamar Moses

Tim: What brought you to playwriting? Itamar: I was interested in writing from a pretty young age. I was a big sci-fi and fantasy book nerd as a kid. And so I think my first writing ambition was to write fantasy novels. Then in high school, I was at Berkeley High, which is a really crazy, diverse place to go to school, and the clique of weird, outsider, artsy kids at Berkeley High who were a little older than I was were really impressive to me. I thought they were really, really cool and they were writing plays and putting them on and I thought that was really exciting.